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and finally, they were adopted when the united nations declaration of human rights was put in force after world war ii. thanks in part to eleanor roosevelt who helped draft the declaration after her husband's death. virtually every industrialized nation has taken a step to industrialize these rights and have some kind of health coverage for their citizens with some major exceptions are you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. tell us what you think about this programming this weekend. you can tweet us at apple tv and comment and send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> up next, "after words" with james hershberg and the international history project. we will have david coleman and his a list work, "the fourteenth day: jfk and the aftermath of the cuban missile crisis." he is the director of the miller center and he details the what happened on october 22, 1962. president kennedy walked a fine diplomatic line to remove weaponry from cuba. >> host: david, most of us are focused on those 13 days back in 1969. you are focusing on the aftermat
. >> yes, it is. >> bill: i have a library out back. this book is about the united nations taking over the world. right? >> not really. if you like some like "hunger games" or" 1984", it's a fictionalized story of let's take what's in the book from the united nations and then let's play it out. what does the world look like if that is -- if that's your framework. >> bill: what's agenda 21? >> it's all about sustainable food, sustainable environment, social justice, economic justice, and it is something that the united nations, through george h.w bush, put in, went into our federal level, now down to our state and local level, and it's all about controlling almost every aspect of your life for the greater good. >> bill: now, when you say george bush the elder, he was the u.n. ambassador at the time, right? >> he was the president. >> bill: he was the president. >> he signed it in and repeated the president's council for sustainable development. >> bill: so you take this, which in theory is probably a good thing. we want a clean environment. >> but if you look at what they say the proble
to bring it up in november at the united nations after the midterm election. he been broadcasting this through the summer. kennedy had been reading about this and reading the reports. they conditioned going to the crisis to believe that crew sheaf is going to force the issue. that's the issue that kennedy keeps coming back to cuba. if you ask kennedy what is crew sheaf up to. and kennedy was talking about this. kennedy would say west berlin. he would not say defense of cuba. the defense of cuba angle doesn't come through a lot for the american. not really thinking this through. it doesn't make sense to them. it doesn't sound like the way you defend cuba. the way from the american perspective in 1962 to do a mutual treaty or send lots of cop vengessal weapons which is what they were doing. but not send long range missile to threaten the united states. it's funny khrushchev accept the tactical battle field weapon. i think kennedy would have had a harder time convincing the world they were offensive weapon. >> guest: exactly. the flip side of that is that that kind of deterrence angl
.s. ambassador to the united nations will muster all of her diplomatic skills and tiptoe through a political mine field. susan rice meets with republican senator john mccain. as you know, mccain had vehemently opposed her nomination of secretary of state. now he shows signs of softening. at issue, that deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. was rice playing politics when she said initially that terrorists were not to blame for the killing of four americans? minutes ago, we caught up to senator mccain for these exclusive comments. >> what do you have to learn today from miss rice? >> whatever ambassador rice wants to tell me. she's the one who asked for the meeting. i didn't. >> do you trust her to be secretary of state? >> this issue needs to be resolved, clearly. it needs to be resolved before -- i don't make a judgment as to whether she should be secretary of state or not until she's been nominated. >> you put more blame on the president or miss rice? >> the president is ultimately responsible. >> cnn's dan lothian first reported this morning's meeting with rice and mccain. he joins us n
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
ambassador to united nations, go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparation and responsibilities for that job. and that's troubling to me as well. why she wouldn't have asked i'm the person that doesn't anything about this and i'm going on every singer show, but in addition, the fact that it's not just the talking points that were unclassified. clearly it was part of a responsibility as an ambassador to united nations to review much more than that. [inaudible] >> before anybody could make an intelligent decision about promoting someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more. to this date, we don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors conducted one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said the night of the attack, as of this date. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends felt like a john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision about ambassador bolton's qualifications. john bolton, the then ambassador, and democratic saying we're not going to go, we're no
of their national perspectives we should consider. i think about allies as well with united states have been foreign allies and through steadying interaction and what were the elements to agree and disagree will help us to understand iraq war afghanistan -- of guinness dan. it is works like this that would help. >>host: "in buddha's company" thai soldiers in the vietnam war." . . day professor at the naval academy. thank you for your time. >>host: you may recognize him from a former book and he is back with a new book on the potomac river. where does it start and end? >> it starts in fairfax near west virginia a tiny little circle and it then that point* look out when the river is 12 miles wide and in between there is history. it is where our nation in europe. it also has the nation's capital. >>host: people think about the white house and the potomac river. why is that? >> they think of washington d.c. are the national monument why do they think of of potomac river? >> for those in the area is seen as an obstacl
as the ambassador of a united nation to reveal more than that. >> before anyone can promote anyone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more to this date. we don't have the sea of fbi interviews of the survivors conducted one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said of the attack shared with congress as of this date. i remember the john bolton episode pretty well. our democrat friends feel like john bolton didn't have the information needed to inform a decision of john bollen to being ambassador -- >> you've been listening live to two of the three republican shares that u.n. ambassador susan rice met with this morning. that's lindsey graham of south carolina and the new hampshire senator, certainly her harshest critics. reportedly susan rice requested the meeting. the third senator was john mccain. she's considered a top pick to replace hillary clinton and if nominated rice would have to be confirmed by the senate and there's questions about the handling of the situation. this story continues in washington, d.c. it will be interesting to see
's chairmanship it will be the united states. there are only eight nations making up the arctic council, but the whole world is interested. china is interested in maritime commerce potential and the resources and the potential for a car rental catastrophes, which is very gigantic there as well. rescue missions, etc. what is the special burdens of canada and the united states with respect to the arctic council and should countries like china be allowed observance status? do think the next congress will ratify the treaty? if not, why not? >> the special burden, the role of the arctic council members, all of whom are democracies, one of the -- one of the underpinnings is a rules-based system. a respect for the rule of law. in addition to accountability to the people who elect you. canada has tremendous attachment and affection and over the largest part of the arctic. there are certain special obligations that come with that, stored ship of the environment. we have enormous interest in our own resources and our people. 40% of canadian land mass is above the 50th parallel, yet we only health
, the republicans determination, too well the north into the unit that could win a national election without any southern support, republicans repeatedly condemned the south as aggressive, undemocratic, even un-american. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, southern sectional radicals known as fire eaters, those people who preached the gospel of this union, they took to the public platform and to the newspaper columns to proclaim that the crisis of the south was at hand. the south had to act immediately to protect itself from the hatred of evil republicans, cries of secession filled the southern air. now, this was not the first time sectional crisis had gripped the country, however. there have been several sharp sectional disputes prior to 1860. each of these, each of the major ones had been settled by a compromise. here i will point specifically to the four critical ones. first, the constitutional convention of 1787 in philadelphia. the missouri crisis of 1820, had to do with the admission of missouri as a slave state, the future slavery in the louisiana purchase which, of course
that would allow it to project force to the region without having to depend upon the host nation support. the second step that the united states reluctantly took towards assuming some of those same british commitments, came later on in the decade with the fall of the shah, and the iranian revolution in 1978 and '79. the u.s. had to rely on saudi arabia and iran in the aftermath of british withdrawal because of america's involvement in vietnam, and with the primary pillar, iran, one of the two twin pillars now gone, the united states had to figure out a way to project military power, since its surrogates would no longer shepherd after western interests in the region. we see here with the carter administration and the late -- late in the carter administration, the enunsation of what would become known as the carter doctrine. in his state of the union suppose in 1980, president carter said in no uncertain terms that an attack on western interests in the persian gulf represents an attack on u.s. vital national interests, and the u.s. will be prepared to use military force in defense of those
. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her on behalf of all of our colleagues in the house, especially the washington dedication. and this -- passage of this bill is dedicated to her family and to the united states park service. i urge passage of h.r.
. >> thank you. >> coming up on c-span, live to new york city where the united nations security council is meeting to discuss the current middle east violence between israel and palestine. that is set for 330 eastern, again, on our companion network, c-span. tonight in prime time here on c-span2, author mark friedman discusses his new book, the big shift, navigating the new stage beyond midlife. he discusses how the baby boom generation is switching to new careers later in life. that begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern, again, here on c-span2. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grants saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? well, yes, he did, and i'm not going to see grant was the only person to save the union, but he was the commanding general of the army's dumping of lincoln's policies into effect. he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia that ended the war. if anybody won the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you can't. one of the things we do in history is generali
in the bilateral relationship between the united states and pakistan, one area in which our national interests continue to align, continue to align, is defeating the terrorists on pakistan's soil that threaten both of us. we remain committed to pursuing defense cooperation based on these shared interests. thirdly, we must prevent the emergence of new safe havens for al qaeda elsewhere in the world that could be used to attack the united states or our interests. the last decade of war has shown that coordinated efforts to share intelligence, to conduct operations with partners, are critical to making sure that al qaeda has no place to hide. we will expand these efforts, including, through support and partnership with governments in transition in the middle east and north africa. this campaign against al qaeda will largely take place outside declared combat zones. using a small footprint approach that includes precision partnered activities with foreign special forces operations and capacity building so that partner countries can be more effective in combating terrorism on their own. wherever po
to become the most read filipino newspaper in the united states with circulation of 120,000. he's founding chairperson of national federation of philippine american association, been a voice for immigrants rights, farm workers struggle and -- equity for over five decades. last month he received a lifetime achievement award from the filipino-american press club. he is survived by his wife and seven kids. >> clerk calvillo: thank you, supervisor avalos. supervisor mar. >> supervisor mar: thank you. i first wanted to ask if we could -- meeting in memorium for fay bingham. she passed away november 2, 2012 at the age of 91. she was born in harrison, southh dakota. she moved to san francisco and resided in richmond for at least -- for the last 56 years. she was a long time member of local 2, the hotel and restaurant workers union and worked at the fairmont hotel, and also at the st. francis hotel and ended her career at the bakery. she is preceded in death by her husband who served three years in the coast guard and 30 in the navy. fay will be missed by her two sisters in michigan plus many her
, that the united states had the responsibility to protect the independence of nations from communistic russia. this may south vietnam. now, kennedy had raised troop levels. i won't go into all the things that truman and eisenhower did, but right alone, we are very heavily involved in protect and south vietnam and johnston believed that these prior commitments committed him. he also is a strong cold war era. he is to comment on how the young people protesting simply didn't understand communism because they'd never grown up or had to fight world war ii. they didn't know what appeasement meant in munich, you know, chamberlain forth. the united states must keep its commitments. it was johnson's great misfortune when you either had to fish. kennedy didn't have to do it. >> host: you are referring of course to the nominal theory. >> guest: is a very good cold warrior, but i never bought the domino theory. because this has always made every disappeared histories that this is america thinking that you put up a solid wall. not just united front, the sheer method is just no opposition on these issues a
which i do all the time by the way is, somehow wrong. it is a crime to enter the united states illegally. it is a federal crime. woe are a nation much laws. key i do fine the books as they stand. i'm not committing a hate crime by saying illegal aliens are just that. >> we are a nation of laws and we respect laws but we also respect humane laws. also seen in the past that laws thatin weren't humane have been changed. >> bill: then work to change them. don't demonize people who are accurate in the description as using a slur or using a hate word because it's not true. >> it's funny that you say it's inaccurate and all this. i think that we can take a page from foxag news latino who doesn't use the i word at all who has the policy that they will not join the bandwagon of people dehumanizing immigrants and using this language. >> bill: but i don't think i'm doing that i don't think i'm dehumanizing anybody by describing what the reality is. let me ask you a couple of questions about your belief system. do you believe we should have open borders here that anyonshe who comes to the united sta
successfully at the sub national level. governments in the united states, governments in china that want to attract investment, often more than their national governments want to encourage it. perhaps we can use leverage to improve ipr performance at the regional level in china. i see real possibilities there. >> please join me in thinking this terrific panel. [applause] >> join us tonight for a look at the evolution of facebook with chris cox. he advises clarke ceo zucker byrd and talks about development -- ceo zuckerberg and talks about development. tomorrow on "washington journa l," cybersecurity threats. we're joined by a former navy seal and member of the council on foreign relations. that is followed by a look at labor unions. our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. and then later we will discuss drone strategy. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> this week on "newsmakers," mary kay henry talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for. tomorow at 10:00 am and 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> what about if the soviet unio
the nation's worst drought in decades is getting worse. more than half of the continental united states has been in the drought since summer. conditions had gotten better during october. now the drought has deepened again into due to a continued lack of rain. >>> los angeles times is reporting hostess will shut down down, planning to lay off 15,000 workers right away. analysts expect that some of its famous brands like twinkies and ding dongs will be bought by other companies and may live on. >>> companies cutting back on business travel before the potential fiscal cliff, usa today says. one company will spend $20 billion less in the next two years if the fiscal cliff happens. >>> the boston herald reports massachusetts highway safety director is resigning. sheila burgess came under fire because her driving record includes seven accidents, four speeding violations and a ticket for not wearing a seat belt. did we mention she's the highway safety director? this week, the governor said it was a screw up his words, to hire burgess for that job. she cites health reasons fo
used increasingly by law enforcement officials in the united states. host: mike lyons is a national security analyst. he served in the army and finished his career as executive officer to the deputy chief of staff for operations in the netherlands >>. leah is the next caller. caller: week received a grant money so the police could learn to do surveillance. they are coming into the neighborhoods. they are bringing the drones close to the roof levels banging the roofs causing sleep deprivation. there is no oversight. homeland security never set the committee a up. there is also a problem with health. when you use electromagnetic close to a person, it changes the charge of the cells that causes disease. host: what about the possible health impacts? guest: if you listened to any of the cable networks during the fighting in gaza over the past weeks, you heard that the sound of the unmanned vehicles. it is designed to be used positively to look at traffic patterns. it is designed to be used in ways to help the community. in fact, the crash. they create noise. those things are not consider
to bring that forward. the diplomatic industrial and economic pieces of strategy of united states and for other countries are parts that are used to put forth those pieces that are best for those nations. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things in the interest of the united states. if that is the case, we have to have places where we can bring troops into at a moment's notice or in a short period of time and ordered to be able to, when necessary, put forth military pace. host: you would be against the drawing down some of these bases around the world? caller: i agree that some of them are unnecessary. the military has taken that into account but i am listening to the ones she is talking about and i think that is not exactly the majority. host: which ones in particular are you concerned about with regard to countries? caller: places like japan. the base in germany, i could probably agree with that. in japan, you have a force of their in north korea. north korea is not a force that people should take lightly. guest: thank you, i think ther
to get into today and talk a little bit about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation. what does that mean? we talk about strategy and economics, is there something more fundamental about the way the united states is positioned in the world and its choices? michael has his own followers and accolades. jeff bingaman and i and our whole staff were riveted from much of his staff and guidance at the time. had he moved in along some of the issues we're talking about back then, the united states might not be in the same position. to his left, we have the smart guy who would have evolved from a would have come in that we could have seen as national security adviser. his deputy secretary the treasury under bush. he is a senior foreign policy ambassador to adjourn year -- germany and one of the few people who synthesizes the economic and the national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat and was one of the reasons i moved to washington. to michael's right, we have doug holtz-eakin. he ran the congressional budget office and he is a very distinguished economis
, and when you go around the world before 9-11, and you ask what they thought of the united , they admire the united states. they looked at the united states as the plays that could pull a rabbit out of i have and reinvent itself. they see a nation constrained , overreaching.mo we talked to tim geithner. can you tell other economies what to do? it has been limited. when you look at barack obama's meeting in london when the global economy was on fire, it is interesting. she laid down the gauntlet we are not going to play by the rules. it has been interesting to look at the limits we have influencing a nation like germany. i asked you, do you think america can influence the international system? i would love to see how you see the challenges ahead and put them in a geostrategic all context. >> i think it is as important as a strong military. i think economics is an answer of rebates as important as traditional policy. i think we have moved from an era where rates are the measure of a nation's strength or vulnerability to an era where sovereign interest rates are a measure of strength or vul
by itself to, quote, peacefully grant the state of texas to withdraw from the united states of america and create its own new government. as "the washington post" dana milbank put it in a recent column, if obama were serious about being a good steward of the nation's finances, he would let them go. did you hear that? because many of those states are what dana milbank said are confederacy of takers, states that get more federal money than they pay. alabama gets $1.71 from the federal government for every $1 paid in taxes. that's a pretty good deal. louisiana gets $1.45 in federal aid for every $1 they pay in taxes. co-author of the book "bush's brain" and director of the political action committee james braxton peterson associate professor of english at lehigh, and michael steele, former chair of the rnc and a political analyst here at msnbc. gentlemen, this is an extraordinary thing but let's talk about this, professor peterson, recent "daily beast" article you outlined using maps, the line from america in 19 -- 1859 to america today where states are petitioning to secede following oba
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policy, is frequently affected by national interest. to the degree that there is a that what happens in the congo is less important to the united states, we don't cover it. we are infinitely more engaged right now in what's happening in syria, but the coverage of what's happening in syria is not bad but i don't know that it's shed a great deal of light and part of the problem is, even there, you were asking about -- i know you began by asking about what's happening in gaza right now and that i what i think of k konk -- coverage of that, i did hear you correctly? >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story it, becomes an excruciatingly difficult story for american journalists to cover because there is a -- for the most part -- a natural sympathy in this country, a sense of identity in this country with israelis and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine, the late peter jennings, used to, i think, very unfairly be criticized for taking an anti-israeli point of view. it wasn't so much an anti-israeli point of view as that he had spent many years living in the arab worl
of strategy for the united states and for other countries are parts that are used to i guess put forth those pieces that are the best for those nations, for their interest. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things that are within the interest of the united states. if that is the case, then we have to have places that we can bring troops into at a moments notice and in a short period of time in order to be able when necessary to put forth a military piece. >> host: so you are against drawing down some of these bases around the world? >> caller: i would say i agree, some of them are unnecessary and the military has taken that into account but i'm listening to the ones that she is talking about and i'm going, that is not exactly -- >> host: which ones in particular are you concerned about? >> caller: i was listening to her talk about japan and the base in germany, i agreed. the military has looked at and taken account germany. you have a -- in north korea. north korea is not a place that people should take lightly. >> guest: thanks, kevin. there are a
nationalize health care has not worked in europe and canada and it will not work here in the united states. guest: i take issue with a couple of points. this is an entitlement society. i am glad my mother was able to get social security and medicare. she earned it and she got it. i'm sure the seniors feel they paid into the system and the earned it. payments are made into the system based on work that individuals do. when they lose their jobs, they get this insurance. they get what they pay for. entitlements.uncommo it enables them to search for jobs. the president passed a remarkable recovery act program. it wasn't as much as he wanted initially. it created or saved millions of jobs and save millions of people from falling into poverty and created the strongest unemployment insurance program the nation has ever had. host: people have paid into the unemployment insurance. "the washington times" talks about extending the benefits for one year. have americans paid in enough to cover the price tag? guest: that is something that can be made up for in future years. compared to some expenditures
performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> i am proud and honored to introduce two individuals. he is a former staff sergeant of the united states army. he is the first living person to receive the armed forces medal of honor for actions that occurred after the and vietnam war perry dead -- be it now war. the major general was awarded the united states highest military decoration for heroic actions in 1968 during the vietnam war. he served on active duty in the marine corps over 33 years before returning in 1995. his last assignment was in new orleans, louisiana. his decorations include the medal of honor, silver star medal, a bronze star medal, the purple heart, and able accommodation nettle. i now present to you the staff sergeant and the major general. >> the start of this in 2006. jerry served at hotels and conference centers in new york and northern virginia. while serving as general manager as a resort in leesburg, he founded the national medal of honor society. 15 recipients participated. they went on to raise a total of $15
of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight's lecturer became the youngest associate justice ever to serve on united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his
. -- posttraumatic stress disorder. they want to get involved. they contribute to our nation and communities. what they need more than anything else is a connection. they need an on ramp into society when they return. college, unit, our company. that is what we can do. we cannot do it alone. the va is facing serious challenges. have -- there are almost a million disability claims backlog. folks are waiting to find out if they will get care, if they would get payment, what is next. that can be a burden. these are all solvable problems. the challenge is isolated to the veterans community. these conversations are branching out. you do not have to be a veteran to support the movement. it does not matter who you voted for or how you feel about the war. we can be united and reassured that we do not repeat the mistakes of vietnam. last week there was a high- profile debate on domestic policy. the two presidential candidates that together as americans watched. there was a were you did not hear in that debate -- veteran. veterans was not considered a domestic policy priority. that has to change. in order f
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